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stack of zen stones on mossy ground
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A group of students build black mesh cages in an indoor room.
Hayden Mock (right), a student in OysterCorps, building aquaculture cages under the guidance of Todd Bracken from Rattlesnake Cove Oyster Company (left). Photo credit: Anita Grove
Blog

Florida students participating in award-winning OysterCorps gain aquaculture literacy and career confidence as they learn about the cultural and environmental importance of oysters in their own backyard.

ReNEW Schaumburg Elementary middle school 21CCLC students pause at a sandbar on a kayak trip to test for pollutants at the Bogue Falaya. Photo credit: Matt May.
ReNEW Schaumburg Elementary middle school 21CCLC students pause at a sandbar on a kayak trip to test for pollutants at the Bogue Falaya. Photo credit: Matt May.
Blog

In this eeBLUE Watershed Chronicles blog post, Polly Burns, Program Director at ReNEW Schools, and Dinah Maygarden, Director of the Coastal Education Program at the University of New Orleans, bring wetland and watershed science investigative projects to middle school students.

Summer training for four Difference Maker Mentors smiling while they stand in a forest creek.
Difference Maker Mentors summer training. Photo credit: L. Cisneros
Blog

The “Difference Makers Mentors” facilitates environmental education programming that is equitable, culturally sustaining, and welcoming to students. This pertains especially to those who have been historically marginalized within the science and environmental field, and serves as a supportive partnership for environmental action projects tailored to students’ interests, identities, and local community needs.

Interpretive panel titled "Places for Cranes" with text about and images of two cranes
Sandhill cranes at Rowe Sanctuary
Blog

Sandhill Crane migration in southwestern Nebraska, along the Platt River, is one of the planet's spectacular migrations. Over half a million cranes converge on the area in late February through early March, powering the local economy through tourism. However, the cranes use more than the river, feeding on farmland throughout the area, highlighting the importance of private lands in conservation, as well as coordination across political boundaries. This blog examines the factors that make Nebraska's sandhill crane migration a successful fusion of habitat, people, and natural history.

Blog

Check out this great example of E-STEM in action and vote daily for your favorite student project to be crowned Community Choice Winner in Samsung’s Solve for Tomorrow competition! Now through April 23.

Scene of Coastal Camp field trip to Koheo Wetlands with four campers and one scientist.
Ornithologist Arleone Dibbin-Young assists Coastal Camp participants at the Koheo Wetlands as they explore the fragile coastal ecosystem. Photo Credit: Learning Endeavors
Blog

In this eeBLUE Watershed Chronicles blog post, Diana Papini Warren, Executive Director of Learning Endeavors shares how the Champions of Coastal Resilience program continues to grow in Hawaiʻi.