eeRESEARCH: Research You Can Use

Woman testing water at river edge

In collaboration with NAAEE, Duke University is highlighting recent research on relevant topics to help EE practitioners learn from academic literature and create meaningful and engaging environmental education experiences for all students. Each month, we will pull together information from eeRESEARCH summaries about topics such as watershed education, climate change, conservation, and more.

 

Educator teaches water quality and sea-level rise to Project WATERS participants.
Educator teaching water quality and sea-level rise to students alongside high school mentors during Project WATERS. Photo courtesy of Center for Environment and Society, Florida Gulf Coast University.
Blog

In this eeRESEARCH post, part of a series on coastal resilience, Kara Nunnally from Duke University speaks with Dr. Jennifer Jones and Dr. Heather Skaza Acosta about the impact colleges and universities can have in EE through generating meaningful community engagement and training effective nonformal educators.

EE participants take time to reflect on the day's outdoor learning.
EE participants take time to reflect on the day's activities after each outdoor learning experience. Photo courtesy of Galveston Bay Foundation.
Blog

Cindy Wilems, Director of Education at Galveston Bay Foundation, talks about their EE initiatives and the ways they are building a community of coastal resilience in the face of climate change (and stronger storms!). This eeRESEARCH post is part of a series on EE practices for coastal resilience in the United States.

Puget Sound Estuarium visitors at low tide with trained naturalist.
Trained Beach Naturalists show up at local beaches during low tide to interpret tidal life and the intertidal ecosystem for the public. Photo courtesy of Puget Sound Estuarium.
Blog

This post is part of a series on EE practices for coastal resilience in the United States. In collaboration with NAAEE, Duke University is showcasing EE practices and advice from organizations on each coast while highlighting relevant research to help EE practitioners learn from academic literature.

Children from local NC community group use nets to collect estuarine species. Photo courtesy of North Carolina Coastal Federation
Children from a local community group use nets to collect estuarine species in North Carolina. Photo courtesy of North Carolina Coastal Federation.
Blog

This post is part of a series on EE practices for coastal resilience in the United States. In collaboration with NAAEE, Duke University showcases EE practices and advice from organizations on each coast while highlighting relevant research to help EE practitioners learn from academic literature.

four students holding dirt with plants
Blog

This post is part of an eeRESEARCH Library reader engagement series. In collaboration with NAAEE, Duke University highlights recent research on relevant topics to help EE practitioners learn from academic literature. This month, we’re sharing eeRESEARCH summaries about culturally relevant environmental education.